March 30, 2006

Pop

This blog needs to get more entertaining. I’ve been perusing some other blogs and when people write about pop culture stuff, it gets a lot of comments. So here: I can’t believe Gina got booted off. If you know what that means, you can slap me. Actually, I’m not surprised, Gina seemed slightly brain-damaged. Be certain, I do not watch this show alone and not with my full attention. Remember, I am married. American Idol is a show I do not get at all. One person after another singing terrible songs.

Maybe I should write about how dull my life is. Like writing about the cheese sandwich I ate. Or going on David Letterman. Only my wife probably knows what I’m talking about.

Here’s something to cheer up the place: mydeathspace.com. It lists the people who have Myspace pages who have recently died. You can get a fair sense of a person from their Myspace page. You just read for a second, assess them, and move on. Very different experience when they’ve actually died. Makes you think about those people you’ve discounted in the past. Really tragic and sad but interesting. People die. I watch Law and Order and think, these things don’t happen. But it turns out a lot of people are getting stabbed and shot and murdered in some way. Really eerie to see the Myspace pages from the recent Rave shootings. Be careful with this site, it’s haunting. (via Metafilter).

I don’t think that’s going to get the comments rolling in.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Gina has a beautiful face but couldn't take a good picture - sad but true. It would have been nice to see an Asian girl represent but under pressure, she became retarded.
Furonda is crazy looking but her pics continue to get stronger. I was expecting more of Leslie, myself.

el diablo de verde said...

i think if i look at mydeathspace i'll become nostalgic and depressed and possibly suicidal.

which means i'm tempted.

Natalia said...

I have successfully avoided American Idol. Occasionally, some bits seep into the massive mental wall that I've erected, but I keep reinforcing said wall.

I'm Theoden at the Helm's Deep, baby.

Oh, and hello.

Do not judge your blog posts by the amount of comments the receive.

Voix said...

I think people comment a lot on pop culture posts because they feel like they've got something to add to the conversation. I'm not a big tv watcher, so whenever I'm sitting with my colleagues at lunch and a current show pops up, I'm totally at a loss. I have nothing to add.

At the same time, I've done a string of posts on 80s music and got TONS of comments -- we all like to see how our stories are connected perhaps?

And sometimes when I post things that are intellectual and smart and bookish or perhaps intense and emotional? I've had friends tell me that they just didn't know what to say to add to the conversation.

Your blog is lovely. If you want lots of comments, ask easy and fun questions that get your readers engaged into your topic.

Philofaxer said...

I have something to add about most TV shows, but not about American Idol, which I have never watched. (Excepting 5 minutes here and there over the seasons.) What repels me: (1) the judges' grandstanding with unnecessary and untrue superlatives and exclamations; and (2) the fact that so much of the show is based on schadenfreude. I mean, I turn to look at a car wreck as much as the next guy, but I'm not proud of it.

Keep on being honest, Henry. That's what keeps me coming back. All bloggers want comments. But most are too embarrassed to say so, and instead try to surreptitiously doctor up their posts to attract comments. Those attempts comes off cold and distant because they are playing to an audience instead of expressing something intimate. I know I can come here and read beautifully written expressions of things I am sometimes afraid to acknowledge myself.

Henry Baum said...

Thanks for the commments. I wasn't (consciously) fishing for, You're great, don't change a thing, but I like it.

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